MouseBits

Advanced search  

News:

Pages: [1] 2 3 4   Go Down

Author Topic: Explain induction recording  (Read 46916 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Peeplmoovr

  • Member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 115
Explain induction recording
« on: March 31, 2007, 04:05:13 AM »

I tried looking through forums for this info but couldn\'t find it.
My almost nonexistent understanding of induction has me thinking it involves using a mono recording right from a speaker source in park.  How exactly does this work? (without geeking out too much - I\'m not an engineer as you can probably tell from this question).  Does it record from the output of the speaker, or some other way?

Thanks.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2007, 04:05:37 AM by Peeplmoovr »
Logged

kirky

  • Uploader
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1347
Explain induction recording
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2007, 04:51:16 AM »

In laymans terms, an induction recording uses a pickup device that measres the magnetic field around a speaker magnet, NOT the actual sound coming from it.

Radioshack sells them for about $8 or so I think.  They are normally a MONO recording as the speakers they are recorded from are not usually stereo.

There is often a lot of \"noise\" associated with an induction recording that needs to be removed in post processing.

One of my best induction recordings is my 2006 Epcot Entrance Loop, and the Expedition Everest Area Music Loop.  Both were done with a telephone pickup (induction mic) and a camcorder.

There is only one stereo induction recording that I know of, and that\'s my Song of the Rainforest which was recorded as two seperate streams and then assembled.
Logged

Horizons

  • Guest
Explain induction recording
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2007, 01:27:53 PM »

I think some recorders (e.g. Edirol) record a mono track in stereo.
Logged

Peeplmoovr

  • Member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 115
Explain induction recording
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2007, 01:58:22 PM »

Thanks.  Just what I was looking for.  :D
Logged

dolbyman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1791
  • Da' Admin
    • MouseBits
Explain induction recording
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2007, 01:58:24 PM »

Quote
I think some recorders (e.g. Edirol) record a mono track in stereo.


hmm  how ? -_- .. can only be some pseudo dsp if so
« Last Edit: March 31, 2007, 01:58:35 PM by dolbyman »
Logged

kirky

  • Uploader
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1347
Explain induction recording
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2007, 03:47:42 PM »

I would guess that it just \"copies\" the left channel to the right.

I\'m not familiar with the Edirol device, but it does record some good stuff!

If you\'re looking for a device, I would suggest either the Edirol or a minidisc recorder.  I\'m using a Sony RH1 currently
Logged

Peeplmoovr

  • Member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 115
Explain induction recording
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2007, 03:33:14 PM »

I may be looking, so thanks for the advice.  I live near WDW and I\'d like to make some recordings - both for myself and to share with others - and I\'m looking for a decent way to do it without spending a fortune.  :)
Logged

kirky

  • Uploader
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1347
Explain induction recording
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2007, 04:58:17 PM »

Quote from: Peeplmoovr
I\'m looking for a decent way to do it without spending a fortune.  :)

That\'s the tough part...  There are a number of cheaper minidisc devices, you can probably get them off eBay in the $150 range.  I would suggest NOT using a camcorder to record, they often have limited audio options, and the worst is AGC (Automatic Gain Control) and also usually no method for line in.  I record just about everything via line in using a battery box to power the microphones.  This allows for a wider range of volume.  The same mics I use going through the mic in port will quickly overpower the mic resulting is a bunch of static in the recording.

Again, I keep threatening to put up a tutorial, one of these days I will.  Just need a little time ot sit down and work it out (as well as take some pictures) of my setup.
Logged

dolbyman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1791
  • Da' Admin
    • MouseBits
Explain induction recording
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2007, 05:13:32 PM »

for my binaurals I use an iriver ifp899 (1 gig) drive .. but it\'s not longer sold ... it\'s perfect / phantom voltage / manual input volume control/ exchangable battiery (1 AA holds up to 40h\'s straight)

I hope it never breaks :-O
Logged

asdfasdfa

  • Uploader
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20
Explain induction recording
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2007, 09:39:43 AM »

Quick question, if I use an mp3 player to do a line-in induction recording that encodes in .wav format, will it have good quality sound?
Logged

dolbyman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1791
  • Da' Admin
    • MouseBits
Explain induction recording
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2007, 09:43:51 AM »

depends on the electronics..sometimes even uncompressed wave recordings sound bad when the A/D converter and signal processing is cheap

I guess you ust have to try it
Logged

kirky

  • Uploader
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1347
Explain induction recording
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2007, 01:47:28 PM »

Induction doesn't work in the line in port on devices.  Induction pickups work on the mic-in, so that will probably NOT work.  I honestly haveen't tried it, but I think you will need to power the induction mic to work, and that sortof defeats the purpose of using the speaker's magnetic/electronic signals to record.

By mp3 player do you mean iPod?  I've been meaning to try mine to record, but I just haven't gotten the time to work with Podzilla.  I'm thinking there are other ways to get an iPod to record (4th gen) but now that I have my minidisc recorder, it's been a little tough to justify the time.

All induction pickups will introduce some "noise", be it the normal induction hum, as I like to call it) or other interference.  YOu'll need to clean it up regardless, however in theory, WAV should give you a better starting point, but I've seen 320 kbps MP3 clean up very nicely, and I'm using ATRAC 256 on my recordings and I think they sound great as well.
Logged

dolbyman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1791
  • Da' Admin
    • MouseBits
Explain induction recording
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2007, 02:31:56 PM »

Quote
Induction doesn't work in the line in port on devices.  Induction pickups work on the mic-in, so that will probably NOT work.  I honestly haveen't tried it, but I think you will need to power the induction mic to work, and that sortof defeats the purpose of using the speaker's magnetic/electronic signals to record.


thought induction devices work wih some small blackbox converting it to highpass line in -_-
Logged

kirky

  • Uploader
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1347
Explain induction recording
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2007, 04:55:27 PM »

That's not how I do it.  I plug it right into the mic in on my recorder.  I use a battery box for my microphones though.  I haven't tried to do that with the induction pickup.
Logged

SamH

  • Validating
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 7
Re: Explain induction recording
« Reply #14 on: November 28, 2016, 12:51:27 AM »

So I'll be going to WDW in 4 weeks and I want to record some music...Does anyone know where to get a good induction device (or something to limit the background noises) at a fair price? I've been looking around for a while and couldn't find what I was looking for. And if possible, would any devices would work well recording music from the ceiling too?
Thanks!
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 4   Go Up